Sonoran Prevention Works Contracted Trainings

Sonoran Prevention Works provides consultation and trainings for individuals and groups who desire to implement a variety of harm reduction protocols within their organizational framework. As the landscape of drug use, both licit and illicit, continue to take shape, SPW remains a leader in best practices that address both organizational needs and best outcomes for clients. Evidence for harm reduction as both a primary approach and a supplemental tool for addressing drug use and other risky behavior is a recommendation from national organizations such as the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Association (SAMHSA), National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), and The World Health Organization (WHO).

Prices vary based on organization type:

  • Nonprofits with 9 or fewer staff: $150/hr
  • Nonprofits with 10 or more staff or government agencies: $200/hr
  • All other organizations: $250/hr

Training times and content can be customized by request.

To schedule a training email Haley Coles at hcoles@spwaz.org

Overdose and Naloxone 101 (this one's free!)

This training consists of an introductory and educational framework that gives a brief overview of harm reduction, stigma, overdose prevention, recognition, and response. This includes education and training on the use and implementation of Naloxone.

The Integration of Harm Reduction Practice Within Clinical Social Work and Counseling

This training will give an overview of traditional approaches to clinical social work and counseling that have both supported and inhibited harm reduction ideology. Further, this training will address the emerging literature and approach of trauma informed care as a vital construct in addressing substance use disorder (SUD) and other behavioral phenomena. Lastly, the integration of theory into practice will be explored through group participation and role play scenarios. As this training is concluded clinicians, should have the theoretical framework and practical skill set to address clinical work through a trauma informed paradigm and harm reduction lens.

Within the System: Recognizing Substance Use Disorder and Using Harm Reduction for Best Practices

Substance use disorder happens “when the recurrent use of alcohol and/or drugs causes clinically and functionally significant impairment, such as health problems, disability, and failure to meet major responsibilities at work, school, or home.” (SAMHSA). According to the DSM-5, a diagnosis of substance use disorder is based on evidence of impaired control, social impairment, risky use, and pharmacological criteria. Learning to recognize substance use disorder, diagnose and treat appropriately, is the difference between life and death for many Arizonans.

Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to define and describe examples of substance use disorder at different levels.
2. Participants will be able to describe stigma related harm associated with substance use disorder.
3. Participants will be able to define and describe examples of harm reduction as a model of care .
4. Participants will be able to describe the connection between substance use disorder, stigma and the related harm, and harm reduction, and how to put these practice into action in real life models of care for best practices and to assist in ending health disparities among marginalized communities.

Trauma and Substance Use Disorder

Substance Use Disorder (SUD) has recently made many headlines, and for good reason. There is more research now than ever before to confirm SUD often stems from trauma. Our responsibility now is to recognize this connection, learn to screen for both, and when to treat or where to refer. Sonoran Prevention Works has experience and connections in Arizona and is excited to offer this training for better health outcomes among high risk populations.

Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to define and screen for trauma
2. Participants will be able to define and screen for Opioid Use Disorder
3. Participants will gain access and confidence in resources and referrals in AZ

Hepatitis

This presentation will teach participants about hepatitis A, B, and C, with a focus on hepatitis C. Presented with a harm reduction framework, participants will have a clear understanding of hepatitis transmission, particularly among people who inject drugs and people who are homeless, and how it can be prevented. In addition to prevention, symptoms, detection, and treatment will be discussed, as well as local resources available to Arizonans at risk for or living with hepatitis C.

Stimulants

In the frenzy around the opioid epidemic, other substances have been left out of the picture. Although opioid overdose death rates have climbed at alarming rates, death rates from stimulants have also increased. This presentation will discuss different legal and illegal stimulants, their effects, the risks and dangers, as well as harm reduction techniques.

Harm Reduction and Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT): Understanding evidence based approaches to opioid use disorder (OUD).

This training addresses the clinical approach and scientific research backing medical interventions for opioid use disorder (OUD) with a focus on medication assisted treatments (MAT). As MAT emerges as best practice for OUD there remains a significant amount of misunderstanding of its justification and ultimate desired outcomes. These misunderstandings lead to the stigmatization of both the practice of MAT and those who are treated within its paradigm. After the completion of this training participants will have a knowledge base rooted in evidence rather than anecdotal opinion on the use of medications for OUD.

Better Health Outcomes for Substance Use Disorder in Diverse Communities

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), does not use the term substance abuse or substance dependence; instead it has changed its language to “substance use disorders” (SUDs). We can use this knowledge to shift how we treat people with SUD in diverse communities for better health outcomes and better quality of life. By focusing on the individual needs of each diverse person, we can change the way SUD is viewed from a moral issue to a mental health issue, and begin to address health disparities with evidence based approaches. This workshop will give examples of some of these approaches, as well as give examples of real Arizona communities applying these approaches in diverse populations.

Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to define and describe examples of substance use disorder at different levels.
2. Participants will be able to describe stigma related harm associated with substance use disorder.
3. Participants will be able to describe the connection between substance use disorder, stigma and the related harm, and harm reduction, and how to put these practice into action in real life models of care for best practices and to assist in ending health disparities in diverse communities.

Rural Health Disparities: Creative Outreach and Community Collaboration

Substance Use Disorder (SUD) in rural settings presents a set of unique challenges, requiring creative outreach techniques and even more creative community collaborations! Sonoran Prevention Works has dealt with many challenges in lowering health disparities among SUD in rural areas of Arizona, and is excited to share these strategies for best practices across all sectors in serving our fellow Arizonans. We will also highlight our newest collaboration, Kingman Harm Reduction Program, which is a strong example of intersectional collaborations to end health disparities, working with law enforcement, behavioral health providers, and more!

Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to define harm reduction and stigma, and describe specific health disparities among people who use drugs and people with substance use disorder.
2. Participants will be able to identify issues with outreaching in rural communities that are specifically impacted in Arizona, and see positive solutions in order to create connected communities.
3. Participants will reach a personal/professional conclusion and/or solution with issues in reaching rural communities they are attempting to serve.

History of the Criminalization of Drugs

This training examines the history of drug criminalization, and the social implications it has had. Beginning with opium prohibition in the 1800’s, we examine the racial and economic motivations behind the history of drug prohibitions, and their role in the stigma that exists today surrounding substance use. By gaining a more thorough understanding of the history of stigma toward people who use drugs, participants will be able to view their individual interactions with clients who use drugs in a more holistic and nuanced manner, and gain additional skills to be more culturally competent.

Learning Objective:
Participants will have a clear understanding of timeline of the criminalization of drugs
Participants will be able to connect timeline to racial discrimination
Participants will be able to apply this education to create a more culturally competent lifestyle.